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Remarks by President Trump at the Economic Club of New York, November 12, 2019 - Whitehouse.gov

Trump Threatens Higher Tariffs if No China Deal 

In a Nov. 12 speech to the Economic Club of New York, Trump said a “significant phase one trade deal with China … could happen soon.” But he also sought to increase pressure on China by holding out the threat of more tariffs. “If we don’t make a deal, we’re going to substantially raise” tariffs on List 1, 2, and 3 goods, he said. A Chinese government-controlled media outlet responded that “if there’s no rollback of tariffs, there will be no phase 1 deal.”

To read the speech in its entirety, go here



 





Federal Register Notices:





 

USITC Votes to Continue Investigations Concerning Glass Containers from China - U.S. International Trade Commission

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that there is a reasonable indication that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of glass containers from China that are allegedly subsidized and sold in the United States at less than fair value. 

Chairman David S. Johanson and Commissioners Rhonda K. Schmidtlein, Jason E. Kearns, Randolph J. Stayin, and Amy A. Karpel voted in the affirmative.

As a result of the Commission’s affirmative determinations, the U.S. Department of Commerce will continue with its antidumping and countervailing duty investigations concerning imports of these products from China, with its preliminary countervailing duty determination due on or about December 19, 2019, and its preliminary antidumping duty determination due on or about March 3, 2020.

The Commission’s public report Glass Containers from China (Inv. Nos. 701-TA-630 and 731-TA-1462 (Preliminary), USITC Publication 4996, November 2019) will contain the views of the Commission and information developed during the investigations.

The report will be available after December 10, 2019; when available, it may be accessed on the USITC website at:  https://www.usitc.gov/commission_publications_library.

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UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20436
FACTUAL HIGHLIGHTS
Glass Containers from China.
Investigation Nos. 701-TA-630 and 731-TA-1462 (Preliminary)

Product Description:  The merchandise subject to these investigations are certain glass containers with a nominal capacity of 0.059 liters (2.0 fluid ounces) up to and including 4.0 liters (135.256 fluid ounces) and an opening or mouth with a nominal outer diameter of 14 millimeters up to and including 120 millimeters. The scope includes glass jars, bottles, flasks and similar containers; with or without their closures; whether clear or colored; and with or without, design or functional enhancements (including, but not limited to, handles, embossing, labeling, or etching).

Status of Proceedings:
1.   Type of investigation:  Preliminary phase antidumping and countervailing duty investigations.
2.   Petitioners:  American Glass Packing Coalition, Tampa, FL; and Chicago, IL.
3.   USITC Institution Date:  Wednesday, September 25, 2019.
4.   USITC Conference Date:  Wednesday, October 16, 2019.
5.   USITC Vote Date:  Friday, November 8, 2019.
6.   USITC Notification to Commerce Date:  Tuesday, November 12, 2019.

U.S. Industry in 2018:
1.   Number of U.S. producers:  4
2.   Location of producers’ plants:  California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wisconsin.
3.   Production and related workers:  11,510.
4.   U.S. producers’ U.S. shipments:  $4.1 billion.
5.   Apparent U.S. consumption:  1
6.   Ratio of subject imports to apparent U.S. consumption:  1

U.S. Imports in 2018:
1.   Subject imports:  [1]
2.   Nonsubject imports:  1
3.   Leading import sources:  China, Mexico, Taiwan, and Canada.

[1] Withheld to avoid disclosure of business proprietary information.

 



 

Vertical Metal File Cabinets from China Injure U.S. Industry, Says USITC -  U.S. International Trade Commission

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of vertical metal file cabinets from China that the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) has determined are subsidized and sold in the United States at less than fair value.
Chairman David S. Johanson and Commissioners Rhonda K. Schmidtlein, Jason E. Kearns, Randolph J. Stayin, and Amy A. Karpel voted in the affirmative.

As a result of the USITC’s affirmative determinations, Commerce will issue antidumping and countervailing duty orders on imports of this product from China. 

The Commission’s public report Vertical Metal File Cabinets from China (Inv. Nos. 701-TA-623 and 731-TA-1462 (Final), USITC Publication 4995, December 2019) will contain the views of the Commission and information developed during the investigations.

The report will be available by December 30, 2019; when available, it may be accessed on the USITC website at: http://pubapps.usitc.gov/applications/publogs/qry_publication_loglist.asp.

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UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20436
FACTUAL HIGHLIGHTS
Vertical Metal File Cabinets from China
Investigation Nos. 701-TA-623 and 731-TA-1449 (Final)

Product Description:  Vertical metal file cabinets (VMFCs) are freestanding units of carbon and/or alloy steel and/or other metals, being 25 inches or less in width, and containing at least two extendable file drawers that are tall enough to store hanging files for either letter- or legal-sized sized documents. Surfaces of VMFCs can be painted, galvanized, or coated for corrosion protection or aesthetic appearance. Additional features can include: (1) one or more extendable non-file-sized (e.g., box or pencil) drawers; (2) a non-extendable (e.g., a cubby) storage area; or (3) mobility elements (e.g., casters, wheels, or a dolly). The subject merchandise can be imported either fully assembled or unassembled as a ready-to-assemble kit. Excluded from the scope of these investigations are: (1) lateral metal file cabinets, with a width exceeding 25 inches that is greater than the body depth; (2) pedestal file cabinets, with body depths that are greater than or equal to their width, are less than 31 inches tall, and are designed to be either freestanding or attached to or hung beneath a desktop or other work surface; and (3) fire-proof or fire-resistant file cabinets.

Status of Proceedings:

1.   Type of investigations:  Final-phase countervailing duty and antidumping investigations.
2.   Petitioners:  Hirsh Industries LLC, Des Moines, Iowa.
3.   USITC Institution Date:  Tuesday, April 30, 2019.
4.   USITC Hearing Date:  Tuesday, October 8, 2019.
5.   USITC Vote Date:  Friday, November 8, 2019.
6.   USITC Notification to Commerce Date:  Tuesday, December 9, 2019.

U.S. Industry in 2018:

1.   Number of U.S. producers:  6.
2.   Location of producers’ plants:  Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Tennessee, and Wisconsin.
3.   Production and related workers:  [1]
4.   U.S. producers’ U.S. shipments:  1
5.   Apparent U.S. consumption:  1
6.   Ratio of subject imports to apparent U.S. consumption:  1

U.S. Imports in 2018:

1.   Subject imports:  1
2.   Nonsubject imports:  1
3.   Leading import sources:  China and Mexico.  

[1] Withheld to avoid revealing business proprietary information.

 

CBP Finds Liquid Cocaine in Shampoo Bottles - U.S. Customs & Border Protection

HOUSTON – U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers working at the George Bush Intercontinental Airport intercepted a traveler attempting to smuggle 35 pounds of liquid cocaine in full-sized shampoo bottles, Nov. 11.

Among his clothing in is checked luggage, the traveler, a Colombian citizen, was carrying 24 bottles of shampoo that contained the illicit liquid narcotic valued at over $400,000. 

“Our officers are the first line of defense at our ports of entry, so they are trained in the various smuggling methods people use to bring illicit goods into the U.S.,” said CBP Port Director Shawn Polley.  “We take every opportunity to intercept those illicit goods before they enter our communities, in this case it was 35 pounds of liquid cocaine.”

CBP officers experience, training and intuition lead them to question the 26-year-old would-be smuggler as he retrieved his checked baggage from the luggage carousel. Officers questioned the passenger and that interaction led them to conduct a baggage exam where they discovered the two dozen shampoo bottles concealing the liquid cocaine.   

When the officers discovered the full-sized shampoo bottles, they requested a CBP K9 to examine the bottles.  The K9 alerted in a manner to indicate the presence of narcotics in the shampoo bottles.  Officers then tested the contents and those results indicated the substance was cocaine. 

CBP returned the would-be smuggler to Colombia and the narcotics were seized and turned over to the Houston Police Department for further investigation

 



 

CBP Foils Attempt to Smuggle Fake Airbags from China at Ontario International Airport - U.S. Customs & Border Protection

Counterfeit Honda Airbags Mislabeled as “Plastic Boards” 

LOS ANGELES— U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers assigned to Ontario International Airport (ONT) express air cargo operations in Ontario, California in coordination with import specialists assigned to the Automotive & Aerospace Center of Excellence (AA Center) seized eight counterfeit Honda airbags arriving in two express packages from China.

On September 12, CBP officers discovered the airbags while conducting an enforcement examination of the express packages. AA Center import specialists confirmed that the airbags were in violation of the Honda protected trademark. If genuine, the seized airbags would have an estimated manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) of $4,856.

“Protecting the health and safety of the American consumer is a top priority for CBP,” said Carlos C. Martel, CBP Director of Field Operations in Los Angeles. “Counterfeit airbags pose American motorists in extreme danger, they can fail to deploy or even hurt passengers during a collision.”

Airbag fraud occurs after a vehicle is involved in a wreck and the original airbags are replaced. Consumers buying airbags from non-legitimate sources online may encounter counterfeit versions sold at what appears to be a deep discount.

“Airbags are essential car safety features and we know counterfeit devices are a major invisible threat already associated with fatalities in the United States,” NHTSA Acting Administrator James Owens said. “As a safety agency, NHTSA takes these cases extremely seriously and we applaud CBP’s efforts to intercept dangerous products before they get into circulation. NHTSA values its partnership with CBP and this work is literally saving lives.”

“CBP commits substantial resources to detect, intercept and seize illicit goods arriving in the express package environment,” said Donald R. Kusser, CBP Port Director overseeing ONT international operations. “Counterfeiters are constantly attempting to take advantage of consumers by disguising their illicit goods as legitimate shipments.” 

CBP focuses on priority trade issues such as intellectual property rights and health and safety, in order to protect consumers from harmful products.

CBP established an educational initiative to raise consumer awareness and consciousness about the consequences and dangers that are often associated with the purchase of counterfeit and pirated goods. Information about the Truth Behind Counterfeits public awareness campaign can be found at fakegoodsrealdangers

If you have any suspicion of or information regarding suspected fraud or illegal trade activity, please report the trade violation to e-Allegations Online Trade Violation Reporting System or by calling 1-800-BE-ALERT. 

Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) violations can also be reported to the National Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center at iprcenter.gov/referral or by telephone at 1-866-IPR-2060.

NHTSA’s mission is to save lives, prevent injuries, and reduce economic costs due to road traffic crashes through education, research, safety standards, and enforcement. The agency advises that the following consumers that may be at risk of owning a counterfeit air bag:

  • Consumers who have had air bags replaced at a repair shop that is not a new car dealer franchised to perform the repair
  • Consumers who have purchased a used car that may have sustained an air bag deployment before their purchase
  • Consumers who own a car with a salvage title
  • Consumers who have purchased replacement airbags from eBay or other non-certified sources—especially if they were purchased at unusually low prices (i.e. less than $400)      

Concerned consumers should contact their local certified automotive franchised dealer to have their vehicle inspected and visit nhtsa.gov/equipment/air-bags for more information.

 

September Proves to be Another Strong Showing for the Port of NY & NJ - Port of NY & NJ / Breaking Waves

The Port of New York and New Jersey monthly cargo volumes continue to increase during the month of September. Total volume for September 2019 was 624,961 TEUs (352,098 lifts) versus 603,034 TEUs (341,676 lifts) in September 2018, a 3.6 percent increase. Bringing our year through September total to 5,620,381 TEUs. Import loads (TEUs) were up 3.9 percent in September 2019 vs. September 2018, export loads (TEUs) decreased 0.4 percent in September 2019 vs. September 2018. Export empties increased 5.7 percent totaling 191,143 TEUs in September 2019 versus 180,880 TEUs in September 2018.

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