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USITC Votes to Continue Investigations Concerning Ceramic Tile from China  US International Trade Commission

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that there is a reasonable indication that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of ceramic tile from China that are allegedly subsidized and sold in the United States at less than fair value.

Chairman David S. Johanson and Commissioners Irving A. Williamson, Meredith M. Broadbent, Rhonda K. Schmidtlein, and Jason E. Kearns voted in the affirmative.

As a result of the Commission’s affirmative determinations, the U.S. Department of Commerce will continue with its antidumping and countervailing duty investigations concerning imports of this product from China, with its preliminary countervailing duty determination due on or about July 5, 2019, and its preliminary antidumping duty determination due on or about September 17, 2019.

The Commission’s public report Ceramic Tile from China (Inv. Nos. 701-TA-621 and 731-TA-1447 (Preliminary), USITC Publication 4898, June 2019) will contain the views of the Commission and information developed during the investigations.

The report will be available after June 25, 2019; when available, it may be accessed on the USITC website at:  https://www.usitc.gov/commission_publications_library.

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UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20436
FACTUAL HIGHLIGHTS
Ceramic Tile from China
Investigation Nos. 701-TA-621 and 731-TA-1447 (Preliminary)

Product Description:  Ceramic tile (e.g., ceramic flooring tile, wall tile, paving tile, hearth tile, porcelain tile, mosaic tile, flags, finishing tile, etc.) that is fired so the raw materials are fused to produce a finished product that is less than 3.2 cm thick. All ceramic tile is subject to the scope regardless of end use, surface area, and weight; whether glazed or unglazed; regardless of the water absorption coefficient by weight; regardless of the extent of vitrification; and whether or not the tile is on a backing. Ceramic tile may include decorative features that may in spots exceed 3.2 cm in thickness. Subject merchandise also includes ceramic tile that undergoes minor processing (e.g., beveling, cutting, trimming, staining, painting, polishing, finishing, additional firing, etc.) in a third country prior to importation into the United States.

Status of Proceedings:

1.   Type of investigations:  Preliminary phase countervailing duty and antidumping investigations.
2.   Petitioners:  American Wonder Porcelain, Lebanon, Tennessee; Crossville Inc., Crossville, Tennessee; Dal‐Tile Corp., Dallas, Texas; Del Conca USA, Inc., Loudon, Tennessee; Florida Tile, Inc., Lexington, Kentucky; Florim USA, Clarksville, Tennessee; Landmark Ceramics, Mount Pleasant, Tennessee; and StonePeak Ceramics, Chicago, Illinois.
3.   USITC Institution Date:  Wednesday, April 10, 2019.
4.   USITC Conference Date:  Wednesday, May 1, 2019.
5.   USITC Vote Date:  Friday, May 24, 2019.
6.   USITC Notification to Commerce Date:  Friday, May 28, 2019.

U.S. Industry in 2018:

1.   Number of U.S. producers:  9.
2.   Location of producers’ plants:  Alabama, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas.
3.   Production and related workers:  2,976.
4.   U.S. producers’ U.S. shipments:  $1.2 billion.
5.   Apparent U.S. consumption:  $3.5 billion.
6.   Ratio of subject imports to apparent U.S. consumption:  17.8 percent.

U.S. Imports in 2018:

1.   Subject imports:  $626.3 million.
2.   Nonsubject imports:  $1.7 billion.
3.   Leading import sources:  Brazil, China, Italy, Mexico, and Spain.


Glycine From China, India and Japan - US. International Trade Commission

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of glycine from India and Japan that the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) has determined are sold in the United States at less than fair value and imports that are subsidized by the governments of China and India.

Chairman David S. Johanson and Commissioners Irving A. Williamson, Meredith M. Broadbent, Rhonda K. Schmidtlein, and Jason E. Kearns voted in the affirmative. 

As a result of the USITC’s affirmative determinations, Commerce will issue antidumping duty orders on imports of this product from India and Japan and countervailing duty orders on imports of this product from China and India. 

The Commission’s public report Glycine from China, India, and Japan (Inv. Nos. 701-TA-603-604 and 731-TA-1413-1414 (Final), USITC Publication 4900, June 2019) will contain the views of the Commission and information developed during the investigations.

The report will be available by July 5, 2019; when available, it may be accessed on the USITC website at: https://www.usitc.gov/commission_publications_library.

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UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20436
 
FACTUAL HIGHLIGHTS
 
Glycine from China, India, and Japan
Investigation Nos. 701-TA-603-604 and 731-TA-1413-1414 (Final)

 
Product Description:  Glycine, also known as aminoacetic acid, is a nonessential amino acid (Chemical Abstracts Service registry number 56-40-6). The organic chemical is produced naturally by humans and other organisms as a building block for proteins. Commercial production of glycine uses traditional chemical synthesis. Glycine is most commonly sold in its dry form as a white, free flowing powder. Glycine is odorless and sweet to the taste. Available in various grades, glycine is used in industrial applications, as well as pharmaceutical and food applications.

Status of Proceedings:
1.   Type of investigations:  Final phase antidumping duty and countervailing duty investigations.
2.   Petitioners:  Chattem and GEO.
3.   USITC Institution Date:  Wednesday, March 28, 2018.
4.   USITC Hearing Date:  Tuesday, April 30, 2019.
5.   USITC Vote Date:  Wednesday, May 29, 2019.
6.   USITC Notification to Commerce Date:  Friday, June 14, 2019.

U.S. Industry in 2017:
1.   Number of U.S. producers:  2
2.   Location of producers’ plants:  Tennessee and Texas.
3.   Production and related workers:  [1]
4.   U.S. producers’ U.S. shipments:  1
5.   Apparent U.S. consumption:  1
6.   Ratio of imports from China, India, and Japan to apparent U.S. consumption:  1

U.S. Imports in 2017:
1.   U.S. imports from China, India, and Japan:  $18.6 million.
2.   U.S. imports from Thailand:  $4.6 million.
3.   U.S. imports from all other sources: $480,000.
4.   Leading import sources:  China, India, Japan, and Thailand.

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[1] Withheld to avoid disclosure of business proprietary information.


Federal Register Notices:

WASHINGTON – Today, under the leadership of President Donald J. Trump, the U.S. Department of Commerce announced that it has issued a notice of proposed rulemaking to impose countervailing duties on countries that act to undervalue their currency relative to the dollar, resulting in a subsidy to their exports. U.S. law defines a countervailable subsidy as a financial contribution from a government or public entity that is specific and that provides a benefit to a foreign producer or exporter.

“This change puts foreign exporters on notice that the Department of Commerce can countervail currency subsidies that harm U.S. industries,” said Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. “Foreign nations would no longer be able to use currency policies to the disadvantage of American workers and businesses. This proposed rulemaking is a step toward implementing President Trump’s campaign promise to address unfair currency practices by our trading partners.”

The draft regulation identifies the criteria the Department would use to determine if countervailing duties should be imposed for currency undervaluation.

Since the beginning of President Trump’s term in office, the strict enforcement of U.S. trade laws has been a focus of his Administration. Just in the area of antidumping and countervailing duty enforcement, Commerce has initiated 164 new investigations – a 215 percent increase from the comparable period in the previous administration.

The Enforcement and Compliance unit within the International Trade Administration of the Department of Commerce is responsible for countervailing duty proceedings and determinations. Along with antidumping laws, countervailing duty laws provide American businesses and workers with an internationally accepted mechanism to seek relief from the harmful effects of unfairly traded imports into the United States.
Commerce currently maintains 481 antidumping and countervailing duty orders which provide relief to American companies and industries impacted by unfair trade.


U.S. Department of Commerce Issues Affirmative Preliminary Antidumping Duty Determination on Mattresses from China - U.S. Department of Commerce

Today (5/29/19), the U.S. Department of Commerce announced the affirmative preliminary determination in the antidumping duty (AD) investigation of imports of mattresses from China, finding that exporters from China have dumped mattresses in the United States at margins ranging from 38.56 to 1,731.75 percent.

As a result of today’s decisions, Commerce will instruct U.S. Customs and Border Protection to collect cash deposits from importers of mattresses from China based on the preliminary rates noted above.

In 2017, imports of mattresses from China were valued at an estimated $436.5 million.

The petitioners are Corsicana Mattress Company (Dallas, TX), Elite Comfort Solutions (Newman, GA), Future Foam Inc. (Council Bluffs, IA), FXI Inc. (Media, PA), Innocor, Inc. (Red Bank, NJ), Kolcraft Enterprises Inc. (Chicago, IL), Leggett & Platt, Incorporated (Carthage, MO), Serta Simmons Bedding, LLC (Atlanta, GA), and Tempur Sealy International, Inc. (Lexington, KY).

The strict enforcement of U.S. trade law is a primary focus of the Trump Administration. Since the beginning of the current Administration, Commerce has initiated 168 new antidumping and countervailing duty investigations – this is a 223 percent increase from the comparable period in the previous administration.

Antidumping and countervailing duty laws provide American businesses and workers with an internationally accepted mechanism to seek relief from the harmful effects of the unfair pricing of imports into the United States. Commerce currently maintains 481 antidumping and countervailing duty orders which provide relief to American companies and industries impacted by unfair trade.

Commerce is scheduled to announce the final determinations on or about October 11, 2019.

If Commerce’s final determinations are affirmative, the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) will be scheduled to make its final injury determinations on or about November 24, 2019. If Commerce makes affirmative final determinations of dumping, and the ITC makes affirmative final injury determinations, Commerce will issue AD orders. If Commerce makes negative final determinations of dumping, or the ITC makes negative final determinations of injury, the investigations will be terminated and no orders will be issued.

Click HERE for a fact sheet on today’s decision.

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Enforcement and Compliance unit within the International Trade Administration is responsible for vigorously enforcing U.S. trade law and does so through an impartial, transparent process that abides by international law and is based on factual evidence provided on the record.

Foreign companies that price their products in the U.S. market below the cost of production or below prices in their home markets are subject to antidumping duties. Companies that receive unfair subsidies from their governments, such as grants, loans, equity infusions, tax breaks, or production inputs, are subject to countervailing duties aimed at directly countering those subsidies. 

Seaboard Marine Service to Port of NY & NJ Connects Brooklyn’s Red Hook Container Terminal to South America and the Caribbean - Port of NY/NJ - Breaking Waves

Seaboard Marine enhanced their North Atlantic services to include a weekly service at the Port of New York and New Jersey, connecting Red Hook Container   Read More
 
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