New York - Miami - Los Angeles Friday, December 14, 2018
C-TPAT
  You are here:  Newsletter
 
Newsletters Minimize
 

09

U.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping and Countervailable Subsidization of Imports of Large Diameter Welded Pipe from China and India - U.S. Department of Commerce

Today (11/7/18), the U.S. Department of Commerce announced the affirmative final determinations in the antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations of imports of large diameter welded pipe from China and India, finding that exporters from these countries have sold large diameter welded pipe at less than fair value in the United States at rates of 132.63 percent and 50.55 percent, respectively. Commerce also determined that exporters from China and India received countervailable subsidies at rates of 198.49 percent and 541.15 percent, respectively.

In 2017, imports of large diameter welded pipe from China and India were valued at an estimated $29.2 million and $294.7 million, respectively.

The petitioners are American Cast Iron Pipe Company (Birmingham, AL), Berg Steel Pipe Corp. (Panama City, FL), Berg Spiral Pipe Corp., Dura-Bond Industries (Steelton, PA), Skyline Steel (Parsippany, NJ), and Stupp Corporation (Baton Rouge, LA).

The strict enforcement of U.S. trade law is a primary focus of the Trump Administration. Since the beginning of the current Administration, Commerce has initiated 131 new antidumping and countervailing duty investigations – this is a 245 percent increase from the comparable period in the previous administration.

Antidumping and countervailing duty laws provide American businesses and workers with an internationally accepted mechanism to seek relief from the harmful effects of the unfair pricing of imports into the United States. Commerce currently maintains 460 antidumping and countervailing duty orders which provide relief to American companies and industries impacted by unfair trade.

The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) is currently scheduled to make its final injury determinations on December 20, 2018. If the ITC makes affirmative final injury determinations, Commerce will issue AD and CVD orders. If the ITC makes negative final determinations of injury, the investigations will be terminated and no orders will be issued.

Click HERE for a fact sheet on today’s decisions.

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Enforcement and Compliance unit within the International Trade Administration is responsible for vigorously enforcing U.S. trade law and does so through an impartial, transparent process that abides by international law and is based on factual evidence provided on the record.

Foreign companies that price their products in the U.S. market below the cost of production or below prices in their home markets are subject to antidumping duties. Companies that receive unfair subsidies from their governments, such as grants, loans, equity infusions, tax breaks, or production inputs, are subject to countervailing duties aimed at directly countering those subsidies.


In Historic Proceedings, U.S. Department of Commerce Finds Dumping and Subsidization of Imports of Common Alloy Aluminum Sheet from China - U.S. Department of Commerce

WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the affirmative final determinations in the first antidumping duty (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) trade cases the Federal government has initiated since 1985. These investigations, concerning Chinese imports of common alloy aluminum sheet, were initiated by the Enforcement and Compliance division of the Commerce Department’s International Trade Administration under the authority granted to the Secretary in the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended.

“President Trump has been clear in the need for drastic action to defend American workers and businesses from unfair trade practices,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “The Department of Commerce has answered this call – we will continue to do everything in our power under U.S. law to restrict the flow of dumped or subsidized goods into U.S. markets.”

The Department of Commerce determined that exporters from China have sold common alloy aluminum sheet in the United States ranging from 49.85 to 59.72 percent less than fair value, while also finding that China is providing countervailable subsidies to its producers of common alloy aluminum sheet at final rates ranging from 46.48 to 116.49 percent.

In 2017, imports of common alloy aluminum sheet from China were valued at an estimated $900 million.

The strict enforcement of U.S. trade law is a primary focus of the Trump Administration. Since the beginning of the current Administration, Commerce has initiated 131 new antidumping and countervailing duty investigations – this is a 245 percent increase from the comparable period in the previous administration.

Antidumping and countervailing duty laws provide American businesses and workers with an internationally accepted mechanism to seek relief from the harmful effects of the unfair pricing of imports into the United States. Commerce currently maintains 460 antidumping and countervailing duty orders which provide relief to American companies and industries impacted by unfair trade.

The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) is currently scheduled to make its final injury determinations on December 20, 2018. If the ITC makes affirmative final injury determinations, Commerce will issue AD and CVD orders. If the ITC makes negative final determinations of injury, the investigations will be terminated and no orders will be issued.

Click HERE for a fact sheet on today’s decisions.

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s Enforcement and Compliance unit within the International Trade Administration is responsible for vigorously enforcing U.S. trade law and does so through an impartial, transparent process that abides by international law and is based on factual evidence provided on the record.

Foreign companies that price their products in the U.S. market below the cost of production or below prices in their home markets are subject to antidumping duties. Companies that receive unfair subsidies from their governments, such as grants, loans, equity infusions, tax breaks, or production inputs, are subject to countervailing duties aimed at directly countering those subsidies.


Forged Steel Fittings from China and Italy Injure U.S. Industry, Says USITC - US International Trade Commission

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of forged steel fittings from China and Italy that the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) has determined are sold in the United States at less than fair value and subsidized by the government of China.

Chairman David S. Johanson and Commissioners Irving A. Williamson, Meredith M. Broadbent, Rhonda K. Schmidtlein, and Jason E. Kearns voted in the affirmative.

As a result of the USITC’s affirmative determinations, Commerce will issue antidumping duty orders on imports of this product from China and Italy and a countervailing duty order on imports of this product from China.

The Commission’s public report Forged Steel Fittings from China and Italy (Inv. Nos. 701-TA-589 and 731-TA-1394-1395 (Final), USITC Publication 4850, November 2018) will contain the views of the Commission and information developed during the investigations.

The report will be available by December 10, 2018; when available, it may be accessed on the USITC website at: http://pubapps.usitc.gov/applications/publogs/qry_publication_loglist.asp.

Read further FACTUAL HIGHLIGHTS


Probable Economic Effect of Providing Duty Free Treatment for Currently Dutiable Imports from Japan Will Be Focus of New USITC Investigation - U.S. International Trade Commission

The U.S. International Trade Commission (USITC) is seeking input for a newly initiated investigation into the probable economic effect of providing duty-free treatment for currently dutiable imports from Japan.

The investigation, U.S.-Japan Trade Agreement: Advice on the Probable Economic Effect of Providing Duty-free Treatment for Currently Dutiable Imports, was requested by the USTR in a letter received on October 26, 2018.

As requested, the USITC will advise the President as to the probable economic effect of providing duty-free treatment for imports of currently dutiable  products from Japan on industries in the United States producing like or directly competitive products and on consumers.  In preparing its advice, the USITC will consider each article in chapters 1 through 97 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) for which U.S. tariffs will remain, taking into account implementation of U.S. commitments in the World Trade Organization. The advice will be based on the HTSUS in effect during 2018 and trade data for the year 2017.

In addition, as requested, the USITC will prepare an assessment of the probable economic effects of eliminating tariffs on imports from Japan of certain agricultural products on U.S. industries producing the products concerned and on the U.S. economy as a whole.  A list of the agriculture products is attached to the USTR’s request letter.

The USITC expects to submit its report, which will be confidential, to the USTR by January 24, 2019.

The USITC is seeking input for the investigation from all interested parties and requests that the information focus on the issues for which the USITC is requested to provide information and advice.

The USITC will hold a public hearing in connection with the investigation on December 6, 2018.  Requests to appear at the hearing should be filed no later than 5:15 p.m. on November 26, 2018, with the Secretary, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20436.  For further information, call 202-205-2000.

The USITC also welcomes written submissions for the record.  Written submissions should be addressed to the Secretary of the Commission at the above address and should be submitted at the earliest practical date but no later than 5:15 p.m. on December 13, 2018. All written submissions, except for confidential business information, will be available for public inspection.

Further information on the scope of the investigation and appropriate submissions is available in the USITC’s notice of investigation, dated November 7, 2018, which can be downloaded from the USITC Internet site (www.usitc.gov) or may be obtained by contacting the Office of the Secretary at the above address or at 202-205-2000.


OTEXA:  Textile & Apparel Announcements - Office of Textile & Apparel

11/02/2018 - September 2018 Textile and Apparel Import Report


President Trump Terminates Trade Preference Program Eligibility for Mauritania - U.S. Office of the Unite States Trade Representative

Washington, DC – President Donald J. Trump announced today his intent to terminate the eligibility of Mauritania for trade preference benefits under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), as of January 1, 2019, due to forced labor practices.  The President notified Congress and the Government of Mauritania accordingly.

Based on the results of the required annual AGOA eligibility review, the President determined that Mauritania is not making sufficient progress toward establishing the protection of internationally recognized worker rights.  Consequently, Mauritania is out of compliance with eligibility requirements of AGOA.  Specifically, Mauritania has made insufficient progress toward combating forced labor, in particular the scourge of hereditary slavery.  In addition, the Government of Mauritania continues to restrict the ability of civil society to work freely to address anti-slavery issues.

“Forced or compulsory labor practices like hereditary slavery have no place in the 21st century,” said Deputy U.S. Trade Representative C.J. Mahoney. “This action underscores this Administration’s commitment to ending modern slavery and enforcing labor provisions in our trade laws and trade agreements.  We hope Mauritania will work with us to eradicate forced labor and hereditary slavery so that its AGOA eligibility may be restored in the future.”

The United States will continue to monitor whether Mauritania is making continual progress toward the protection of internationally recognized worker rights (including with respect to forced labor) in accordance with the AGOA eligibility requirements.

Background

Mauritania continues to have the highest prevalence of hereditary slavery in the world.  At a public hearing held on August 16, 2018 for the annual AGOA eligibility review, a representative of the American Federation of Labor & Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) assessed Mauritania’s record of combatting hereditary slavery and concluded that it has failed to meet AGOA’s eligibility criteria with respect to internationally recognized worker rights, including a prohibition on the use of any form of forced or compulsory labor, the right of association, and the right to organize and bargain collectively. Public comments and hearing testimony related to the annual AGOA eligibility review can be accessed at www.regulations.gov under docket number USTR-2018-022.

In order to qualify for AGOA trade benefits, partner countries must meet certain statutory eligibility requirements, including making continual progress toward establishing internationally recognized worker rights, which includes a prohibition on the use of any form of forced or compulsory labor.  Other criteria include not engaging in gross violations of internationally recognized human rights and making continual progress toward establishing the rule of law, political pluralism, and the elimination of barriers to U.S. trade and investment.


Counterfeit Accessories Seized by CBP - U.S. Customs & Border Protection

U. S. Customs and Border Protection Officers Seize Wall Chargers with Counterfeit UL Markings

PORT OF NEW YORK /NEWARK – Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers made a shocking discovery at the Port of New York/Newark: counterfeit wall chargers that could cause grave damage to holiday shoppers, their families, and their homes.  Fortunately, CBP officers are stationed at ports of entry to prevent the release of counterfeit merchandise into the United States.

On September 28, CBP officers at the Port of New York/Newark selected for inspection a shipment of imported merchandise for possible Intellectual Property Rights violations.  Specialists from CBP’s Electronics Center of Excellence and Expertise (eCEE) determined that 150,000 wall chargers, filling 1,500 cartons, bore counterfeit UL markings in violation of 19 U.S.C. §1526(e).  

“Preventing these counterfeit items from entering the United States is crucial to protecting consumers as well as our economy,” said Troy Miller, Director, Field Operations New York.  “Once again our CBP officers at the Port of New York/New Jersey have demonstrated their exceptional skill and superior commodity expertise.”

“The CEEs have transformed the way that CBP conducts trade operations, while working with the ports of entry to better facilitate legitimate trade,” said Jorge Garcia, Director, eCEE.  “This seizure illustrates our working relationship with CBP Officers at the Port of New York/New Jersey to prevent these potentially dangerous products from entering our homes.”

The total manufacturer’s suggested retail price of the seized wall chargers, if they were genuine, was estimated to be more than $2.7 million.

To learn more about CBP’s Centers of Excellence and Expertise visit the Centers of Excellence webpage.​

 
  Copyright © 1997-2018 C-Air Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use