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Coniferous Shingles and Sawn Shakes AD/CVD - U.S.Customs & Border Protection

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has determined that coniferous shingles and sawn shakes from Canada fall within the scope of AD/CVD cases A122-857/C122-858. Entries of this merchandise must be entered under entry type 03 with payment of AD/CV duties. CBP continues to monitor importations of this merchandise, and will take appropriate enforcement actions, including penalty actions, on importers who fail to properly file entries of this merchandise subject to these AD/CVD orders.

The scope of the AD/CVD orders on softwood lumber from Canada (case numbers A-122-857/C-122-858) covers "coniferous wood, sawn, or chipped lengthwise, sliced or peeled, whether or not planed, whether or not sanded, or whether or not finger-jointed, of an actual thickness exceeding six millimeters." Commerce determined in the preliminary determination, and affirmed in the final determination of this investigation that the scope of this proceeding covers softwood lumber products that exceed 6 millimeters in thickness at one end, even if the products are tapered to less than 6 mm at the other end. Therefore, the fact that certain softwood lumber products are tapered to less than 6 millimeters in thickness does not remove them from the scope. Additionally, the fact that certain softwood lumber products are not explicitly named in the scope, or that these products may be covered by an HTS heading that was not specifically listed in the scope, does not necessarily remove them from the scope.

If the importer believes a product may be outside the scope on other grounds, we suggest that the relevant importer file a scope ruling request with the Department of Commerce.

Please note that the scope of the Antidumping and Countervailing orders is independent from that of the expired Softwood Lumber Agreement of 2006 (“SLA”). Parties should not refer to the SLA for guidance on these orders.


Philadelphia CBP Seizes $1.4 Million Shipment of Counterfeit Designer Jewelry from Hong Kong - U.S. Customs & Border Protection

PHILADELPHIA – U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers in Philadelphia seized 269 pieces of designer brand jewelry from Hong Kong March 6, which, if authentic, held a manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) of nearly $1.4 million.

CBP officers initially examined the parcel on February 13. The parcel, destined to a Philadelphia address, was manifested as stainless steel pendent with earrings. Officers discovered that the parcel contained various designer brand jewelry of poor quality and packaging, and suspected it to be counterfeit.

Officers submitted samples to CBP’s Consumer Products and Mass Merchandising Centers for Excellence and Expertise, the agency’s trade experts. CBP’s CEE specialists worked with the trademark holders and on February 28 determined the jewelry to be counterfeit.

Had the jewelry been authentic, it had an assessed MSRP of $1,379,650.

“Intellectual property rights enforcement is a Customs and Border Protection priority trade issue. CBP remains committed to working with our consumer health and safety partners and seizing counterfeit and substandard merchandise at our nation’s borders, especially those products that pose potential harm to American consumers, workers, and businesses,” said Edward Moriarty, CBP Acting Port Director for the Area Port of Philadelphia.

The parcel contained necklaces, bracelets, earrings, and diamond pendants bearing the names Cartier, Chanel, Bvlgari, and Tous.

This is Philadelphia CBP’s second significant counterfeit in a month. On February 28, CBP officers seized $233k in counterfeit designer brand watches from Hong Kong.

CBP protects businesses and consumers every day through an aggressive Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) enforcement program.

On a typical day in 2017, CBP officers seized $3.3 million worth of products with IPR violations. Learn more about what CBP did during "A Typical Day" in 2017.

"The interception of counterfeit items demonstrates the commitment and expertise of Customs and Border Protection officers and import specialists, which is critical to the detection and seizure of unlawful and potentially dangerous imports," said Casey Owen Durst, CBP Director of Field Operations in Baltimore. “The trade of fake goods, and the widespread violation of private intellectual property rights threaten the American economy, as well as our national security.”

In Fiscal Year (FY) 2017, the number of IPR seizures increased 8 percent to 34,143 from 31,560 in FY 2016. The total estimated MSRP of the seized goods, had they been genuine, decreased to $1.2 billion from $1.38 billion in FY 2016. Read more 2017 IPR Enforcement Statistics.

As a result of CBP enforcement efforts, ICE Homeland Security Investigations agents arrested 457 individuals, obtained 288 indictments, and received 242 convictions related to intellectual property crimes in 2017.

If you have information concerning counterfeit merchandise illegally imported into the United States, CBP encourages you to submit an anonymous report through e-Allegations Online Trade Violation Reporting System.

CBP’s Office of Field Operations

Almost a million times each day, CBP officers welcome international travelers into the U.S. In screening both foreign visitors and returning U.S. citizens, CBP uses a variety of techniques to intercept narcotics, unreported currency, weapons, prohibited agriculture, and other illicit products, and to assure that global tourism remains safe and strong.

CBP's border security mission is led at ports of entry by CBP officers from the Office of Field Operations. Please visit CBP Ports of Entry to learn more about how CBP’s Office of Field Operations secures our nation’s borders.


USITC Votes to Continue Investigations on Cast Iron Soil Pipe from China - U.S. International Trade Commission

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that there is a reasonable indication that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of cast iron soil pipe from China that are allegedly subsidized and sold in the United States at less than fair value.

Chairman Rhonda K. Schmidtlein, Vice Chairman David S. Johanson, and Commissioners Irving A. Williamson and Meredith M. Broadbent voted in the affirmative.

As a result of the Commission’s affirmative determinations, the U.S. Department of Commerce will continue with its antidumping and countervailing duty investigations, with its preliminary countervailing duty determinations due on or about April 23, 2018, and its antidumping duty determinations due on or about July 5, 2018.

The Commission’s public report Cast Iron Soil Pipe from China (Inv. Nos. 701-TA-597 and 731-TA-1407 (Preliminary), USITC Publication 4769, March 2018) will contain the views of the Commission and information developed during the investigations.

The report will be available after April 9, 2018; when available, it may be accessed on the USITC website at: http://pubapps.usitc.gov/applications/publogs/qry_publication_loglist.asp.

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UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20436

FACTUAL HIGHLIGHTS

Cast Iron Soil Pipe from the China
Investigation Nos. 701-TA-597 and 731-TA-1407 (Preliminary)

Product Description: The merchandise covered by this proceeding is cast iron soil pipe, whether finished or unfinished, regardless of industry or proprietary specifications, and regardless of wall thickness, length, diameter, surface finish, end finish, or stenciling. The scope of this investigation includes, but is not limited to, both hubless and hub and spigot cast iron soil pipe. Cast iron soil pipe is nonmalleable iron pipe of various designs and sizes. Cast iron soil pipe is generally distinguished from other types of nonmalleable cast iron pipe by the manner in which it is connected to cast iron soil pipe fittings.

Status of Proceedings:

1. Type of investigation: Preliminary phase antidumping duty and countervailing duty investigations.
2. Petitioners: Cast Iron Soil Pipe Institute, Mundelein, IL.
3. USITC Institution Date: Friday, January 26, 2018.
4. USITC Conference Date: Friday, February 16, 2018.
5. USITC Vote Date: Friday, March 9, 2018.
6. USITC Scheduled Notification to Commerce Date: Tuesday, March 13, 2018.

U.S. Industry in 2017:

1. Number of U.S. producers: 2.
2. Location of producers’ plants: California, North Carolina, and Texas.
3. Production and related workers: [1]
4. U.S. producers’ U.S. shipments: 1
5. Apparent U.S. consumption: 1
6. Ratio of subject imports to apparent U.S. consumption: 1

U.S. Imports in 2017:

1. Subject imports: $13.1 million.
2. Nonsubject imports: $757,000.
3. Leading import sources: China


Flake Statement on Plan to Nullify Ill-Advised Tariffs on Steel, Aluminum - Jeff Flake, Arizona Senator

(Posted on March 8, 2018)

WASHINGTON – U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) today released the following statement in response to the just-announced White House plan to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum:

“These so-called ‘flexible tariffs’ are a marriage of two lethal poisons to economic growth – protectionism and uncertainty. Trade wars are not won, they are only lost. Congress cannot be complicit as the administration courts economic disaster. I will immediately draft and introduce legislation to nullify these tariffs, and I urge my colleagues to pass it before this exercise in protectionism inflicts any more damage on the economy.”


Aluminum Foil from China Injures U.S. Industry, Says USITC - U.S. International Trade Commission

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) today determined that a U.S. industry is materially injured by reason of imports of aluminum foil from China that the U.S. Department of Commerce (Commerce) has determined are subsidized and sold in the United States at less than fair value.

Chairman Rhonda K. Schmidtlein, Vice Chairman David S. Johanson, and Commissioners Irving A. Williamson and Meredith M. Broadbent voted in the affirmative.

As a result of the USITC’s affirmative determinations, Commerce will issue antidumping and countervailing duty orders on imports of this product from China.

The Commission’s public report Aluminum Foil from China, Inv. Nos. 701-TA-570 and 731-TA-1346 (Final), USITC Publication 4771, April 2018) will contain the views of the Commission and information developed during the investigations.

The report will be available by April 30, 2018; when available, it may be accessed on the USITC website at: http://pubapps.usitc.gov/applications/publogs/qry_publication_loglist.asp.

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UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20436

FACTUAL HIGHLIGHTS

Aluminum Foil from China
Investigation Nos. 701-TA-570 and 731-TA-1346 (Final)

Product Description: Aluminum foil is a thin wrought aluminum product that is produced via a rolling process. It has a thickness of 0.2 mm or less, is in reels exceeding 25 pounds, regardless of width. It is made from an aluminum alloy that contains more than 92 percent aluminum. Aluminum foil in this instance specifically excludes product that is backed with paper, paperboard, plastics, or similar backing materials on one or both sides of the aluminum foil, as well as etched capacitor foil and aluminum foil that is cut to shape. Aluminum foil is used in food and pharmaceutical packaging and in industrial applications such as thermal insulation, cables, and electronics.

Status of Proceedings:

1. Type of investigation: Final phase antidumping duty and countervailing duty investigations.
2. Petitioners: The Aluminum Association Trade Enforcement Working Group, Arlington, VA.
3. USITC Institution Date: Thursday, March 9, 2017.
4. USITC Hearing Date: Thursday, February 8, 2018.
5. USITC Vote Date: Thursday, March 15, 2018.
6. USITC Notification to Commerce Date: Monday, April 9, 2018.

U.S. Industry in 2016:

1. Number of U.S. producers: 6.
2. Location of producers’ plants: Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia.
3. Production and related workers: [1]
4. U.S. producers’ U.S. shipments: 1
5. Apparent U.S. consumption: 1
6. Ratio of subject imports to apparent U.S. consumption: 1

U.S. Imports in 2016:

1. Subject imports: $431.4 million.
2. Nonsubject imports: $226.4 million.
3. Leading import sources: China, Germany, Russia, and Armenia (in terms of total quantity).
 
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